3816 WEST SLIGH AVENUE
TAMPA, FL, 3361-3961
PHONE: 813.888.7991
FAX: 813.243.8218 
EMAIL ADDRESS:
AAITAMPA@YAHOO.COM 
MONDAY-FRIDAY: 8:30 A.M. - 5:00 P.M.
HOME ABOUT US SERVICES WARRANTY & RETURNS PARTS SHOP ONLINE SCHEDULE APPOINTMENT  CONTACT
MAIN MENU
home
about us
services
warranty & returns
videos
parts
shop online
schedule appointment
contact auto air

MY ACCOUNT
login now
create account

SHOP ONLINE
View My E-Quote
View My Shopping Cart


Rock Bottom Prices
We offer wholesale prices to the public and can beat any competitor's price.


Like us on Facebook! +1 us on Google!



TAGS
Click on the individual part below to learn how it functions with in your vehicle's A/C System.

compressors, evaporators, condensers, accumulators, orifice tubes, expansion valves, weld-on-barbs, splicer barbs, engine cooling fan, hoses and belts, receiver/dryers

Manufacturer & Supplier of Auto
AUTO AIR AND ELECTRIC OF TAMPA ACCUMULATORS
Auto Air & Electric of Tampa sells a complete inventory of New & Remanufactured parts. We are a manufacturer and distributor of automobile air conditioning parts and provide automobile air conditioning service and repair. We order supplies directly from the after market manufacturers, if we don't have what you need in stock, we can make it for you.

 

 

An accumulator is very comparable in purpose to a receiver/dryer. It serves similar, but slightly different functions. An accumulator is also a metal cylinder, but differs from a receiver/dryer in these three ways:

1. An accumulator is considerably larger than a receiver/dryer, usually around twice the volume.

2. The accumulator is connected to the evaporator outlet, in the low pressure section of the system.

3. The accumulator's primary function is to store any liquid refrigerant exiting the evaporator, to prevent it from reaching the compressor. If liquid refrigerant were to enter the compressor, it could cause damage, as the compressor is not designed to pump liquid, only vapor. Accumulators are only used on systems that contain orifice tubes. It is a characteristic of orifice tube systems to have, under certain operating conditions, large amounts of liquid refrigerant leaving the evaporator. In other words, not all of the refrigerant turned into a vapor while it was passing through the evaporator. The accumulator, like the receiver/dryer, also serves as a temporary storage countainer for oil when not needed by the system.

Like receiver/dryers, accumulators also contain the system desiccant, so the same "rules of replacement" apply.


Delivery, Service, & Installation in Tampa Area

Nationwide & International Shipping Available

Call our knowledgeable staff today for the highest-quality products and services at the most affordable prices.

Consumers Beware Gas-saving Devices
Increasingly high fuel prices mean an increase in the number of products that promise to add fuel savings and cut costs at the pumps.
Mon, 08 May 2006 19:00:00 PST
AMSOIL Introduces New Ea Air Induction Filters
AMSOIL unveiled May 1, 2005 its new line of universal air induction filters, designed to replace stock oil wetted gauze or foam conical filters typically supplied by K&N, Injen, Green, AIRAID, AFE, TrueFlow and more.
Mon, 08 May 2006 15:54:00 PST
WHY HARLEY OWNERS CHOOSE AMSOIL Wear Test Comparison - AMSOIL vs. Harley Screamin' Eagle
The recent introduction of Screamin' Eagle® Synthetic Lubricant by Harley-Davidson® indicates the Motor Company has finally recognized the benefits of running synthetic motorcycle oil in their air-cooled engines. After years of advising dealers and customers to avoid using synthetic oils in their bikes, it's natural to wonder why the company is suddenly marketing one.
Tue, 25 Apr 2006 21:04:00 PST
Will Electric Cars Rule?
I was looking through the 36 page car section of a Popular Mechanics when the following article by Roger Huntington caught my eye: "How Far Can We Go With The Piston Engine?" The article begins like this. "An early death for the age-old internal combustion piston engine is the prediction of some people. They say the exhaust can't be cleaned up enough to meet future air-pollution and antismog laws and that we'll be running around with batteries, steam, fuel cells and atomic engines in another ten years."
Tue, 04 Apr 2006 23:59:00 PST
Integrity and Ethics
It started like this. A friend of mine, after checking out my wife's car, said it needed grease. It was loose underneath, he said. There was a new quick lube that opened up near the mall, so I decided to give them a try. I brought the car to the quick lube, told them twice that it was very important that they grease the car and went off to the nearest bookstore on foot.
Tue, 04 Apr 2006 23:51:00 PST
Catching Up With Tommy Hahn
In his second year of Supercross, Tommy Hahn is hoping to put to good use what he learned last year. And from the looks of how fast he was going in his video last week, we think he has a pretty good chance.
Tue, 04 Apr 2006 23:35:00 PST
Mike LaRocco: Exit Interview
Mike LaRocco has had a career that many racers aspire to have. He has won championships, been to the Motocross des Nations, won numerous races and has taken his career into his 30s. Unfortunately, though, it all had to end sometime, and a few weeks ago in front of a packed stadium in Indianapolis he announced his retirement.
Thu, 30 Mar 2006 23:19:00 PST
Five Reasons People Pay a Premium for a Quart of Oil
Peace of Mind – All-season AMSOIL synthetic motor oils help cars start and run dependably in the temperature extremes of northern winters and deep-south summers.
Long-term, AMSOIL synthetic motor oil’s superior cold-temperature fluidity,
Tue, 28 Mar 2006 10:34:00 PST
Conventional vs. Synthetic Lubricants
Conventional lubricants are refined from crude oil. Refining is a process of physically separating light from heavy oil fractions. Crude oil is a natural substance. It contains millions of different kinds of molecules. Many are similar in weight but dissimilar in structure.
Tue, 28 Mar 2006 10:16:00 PST
ExxonMobil Follows AMSOIL into Extended Drain Market
Motor oil technology has gradually progressed since the days of the earliest automobiles. In those days, standard motor oil drain intervals were between 500 and 1000 miles, and motorists had to switch viscosity grades with the changing of the seasons. The development of oil filtration and additive technology in the 1930s allowed drain intervals to increase to 2000 and later 3000 miles, while the development of viscosity modifiers in the 1940s allowed the formulation of multi-grade oils that could be used in both hot and cold temperatures.
Mon, 27 Mar 2006 13:03:00 PST


Auto Air & Electric of Tampa
3816 W Sligh Avenue
Tampa, FL 33614-3961
Copyright 2012 Auto Air & Electric of Tampa
All Rights Reserved
sitemap | xml | reset web session | admin
Phone: 813.888.7991
Fax: 813.243.8218
aaitampa@yahoo.com